Creative Cleaning and Cleansing

"Less Stress from Cleaning the Mess." From decluttering to inspiration! Proverbs 31:27a

7 Day Spring Cleaning Challenge – Day 6

Outdoor is just as rewarding as the indoor when it comes to Deep Cleaning!

Here are some recommendations:

  • Clean out your gutters.
  • Examine all exterior for damages. Wiring, windows, piping, paneling, decking, patio furniture etc…make a list and have items repaired right away. Small fixes now can save you a major expense or major damage.
  • Clean patio furniture and chairs.
  • Remove old potting plants, dead leaves and items that need to be trashed. Replace with new plants that are colorful, especially the entrance.
  • Weed front and back yard.  Fertilize with a weed and feed and then water yard.
  • Add fresh mulch to flowerbeds, tree areas and shrubs.
  • Trim trees, bushes and shrubbery.
  • Replace light bulbs or outside light sources.
  • Clean or replace doormats.
  • Clean any glass that you can reach. Allow the sun in!
  • Clean out your garbage cans, birdbaths, grills etc…
  • Sweep entrances, driveways and sidewalks.
  • Hand a current décor on your door or place in your yard.
  • Clean out your cars. Wash and wax for a maximum clean.
  •  For those that have a pool, or hot tub, or a pond, or other places, clean as usual.

Make some tea and brownies and enjoy the outdoors!

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Water…Tips on how to conserve

water conservation in the home…

1. Check
faucets and pipes for leaks
A small drip from a worn
faucet washer can waste 20 gallons of water per day. Larger leaks can waste
hundreds of gallons.

2. Don’t use
the toilet as an ashtray or wastebasket

Every time
you flush a cigarette butt, facial tissue or other small bit of trash, five to
seven gallons of water is wasted.

3. Check your toilets for leaks
Put a little food
coloring in your toilet tank. If, without flushing, the color begins to appear
in the bowl within 30 minutes, you have a leak that should be repaired
immediately. Most replacement parts are inexpensive and easy to
install.

4. Use your water meter to
check for hidden water leaks
Read the house water meter
before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter
does not read exactly the same, there is a leak.

5. Install water-saving
shower heads and low-flow faucet aerators

Inexpensive
water-saving low-flow
shower heads
 or restrictors are easy for the homeowner to
install. Also, long, hot showers can use five to ten gallons every unneeded
minute. Limit your showers to the time it takes to soap up, wash down and rinse
off. “Low-flow” means it uses less than 2.5 gallons per minute.
You can
easily install a
ShowerStart
showerhead, or add a ShowerStart
converter
to existing showerheads, which automatically pauses a running shower once it
gets warm.
Also, all household faucets should be fit with
aerators
. This single
best home water conservation method is also the cheapest!

6. Put plastic
bottles or float booster in your toilet tank
To cut down on water waste, put an inch
or two of sand or pebbles inside each of two plastic bottles to weigh them down.
Fill the bottles with water, screw the lids on, and put them in your toilet
tank, safely away from the operating mechanisms. Or, buy an inexpensive
tank
bank
or float booster. This may save ten or more gallons of
water per day.

Be sure at least 3 gallons of water remain in the tank so
it will flush properly. If there is not enough water to get a proper flush,
users will hold the lever down too long or do multiple flushes to get rid of
waste. Two flushings at 1.4 gallons is worse than a single 2.0 gallon flush. A
better suggestion would be to buy an adjustable
toilet flapper
that allow for adjustment of their per flush use.
Then the user can adjust the flush rate to the minimum per flush setting that
achieves a single good flush each time.

For new installations, consider
buying “low flush” toilets, which use 1 to 2 gallons per flush instead of the
usual 3 to 5 gallons.

Replacing an 18 liter per flush
toilet with an ultra-low volume (ULV) 6 liter flush model represents a 70%
savings in water flushed and will cut indoor water use by about
30%.

7. Insulate your water pipes.

It’s easy and inexpensive to insulate your water pipes with pre-slit
foam pipe insulation. You’ll get hot water faster plus avoid wasting water while
it heats up.

8. Take shorter showers.
One
way to cut down on water use is to turn off the shower after soaping up, then
turn it back on to rinse. A four-minute shower uses approximately 20 to 40
gallons of water.

9. Turn off the water after you wet
your toothbrush

There is no need to keep the water running
while brushing your teeth. Just wet your brush and fill a glass for mouth
rinsing.

10. Rinse your razor in the
sink

Fill the sink with a few inches of warm water. This will rinse
your razor just as well as running water, with far less waste of
water.

11. Use your dishwasher and clothes washer for
only full loads
Automatic dishwashers and clothes washers
should be fully loaded for optimum water conservation. Most makers of
dishwashing soap recomend not pre-rinsing dishes which is a big water savings.

With clothes washers, avoid the permanent press cycle, which uses an added
20 liters (5 gallons) for the extra rinse. For partial loads, adjust water
levels to match the size of the load. Replace old clothes washers. New Energy
Star rated washers use 35 – 50% less water and 50% less energy per load. If
you’re in the market for a new clothes washer, consider buying a water-saving
frontload
washer
.

12. Minimize use of kitchen sink
garbage disposal units
In-sink ‘garburators’ require lots
of water to operate properly, and also add considerably to the volume of solids
in a septic tank which can lead to maintenance problems. Start a
compost pile
as an alternate method of disposing food waste.

13. When washing dishes by hand,
don’t leave the water running for rinsing
If your have a
double-basin, fill one with soapy water and one with rinse water. If you have a
single-basin sink, gather washed dishes in a dish rack and rinse them with a
spray device or a panful of hot water.
Dual-swivel
aerators
are available to make this
easier. If using a dishwasher, there is usually no need to pre-rinse the
dishes.

14. Don’t let the faucet run while you clean
vegetables
Just rinse them in a stoppered sink or a pan
of clean water. Use a
dual-setting
aerator
.

15. Keep a bottle of
drinking water in the fridge.
Running tap water to cool it off for
drinking water is wasteful. Store drinking water in the fridge in a
safe
drinking bottle
.

water conservation in the yard and garden…

16. Plant drought-resistant lawns,
shrubs and plants
If you are planting a new lawn, or
overseeding an existing lawn, use drought-resistant grasses such as the new
“Eco-Lawn”.
Many
beautiful shrubs and plants thrive with far less watering than other species.
Replace herbaceous perennial borders with native plants. Native plants will use
less water and be more resistant to local plant diseases. Consider applying the
principles of
xeriscape for a
low-maintenance, drought resistant yard.
Plant slopes with plants that will
retain water and help reduce runoff.
Group plants according to their watering
needs.

17. Put a layer of mulch
around trees and plants
Mulch will slow evaporation of moisture
while discouraging weed growth. Adding 2 – 4 inches of organic material such as
compost or bark mulch will increase the ability of the soil to retain moisture.
Press the mulch down around the dripline of each plant to form a slight
depression which will prevent or minimize water runoff.
For information
about different mulch materials and their best use,
click
here
.

18. Don’t water the gutter
Position your sprinklers so water lands on the lawn or garden,
not on paved areas. Also, avoid watering on windy days.

19. Water
your lawn only when it needs it
A good way to see if your lawn needs
watering is to step on the grass. If it springs back up when you move, it
doesn’t need water. If it stays flat, the lawn is ready for watering. Letting
the grass grow taller (to 3″) will also promote water retention in the
soil.
Most lawns only need about 1″ of water each week. During dry spells,
you can stop watering altogether and the lawn will go brown and dormant. Once
cooler weather arrives, the morning dew and rainfall will bring the lawn back to
its usual vigor. This may result in a brown summer lawn, but it saves a lot of
water.

20. Deep-soak your
lawn
When watering the lawn, do it long
enough for the moisture to soak down to the roots where it will do the most
good. A light sprinkling can evaporate quickly and tends to encourage shallow
root systems. Put an empty tuna can on your lawn – when it’s full, you’ve
watered about the right amount. Visit our
natural
lawn care
page for more information.

21.
Water during the early parts of the day; avoid watering when
it’s windy

Early morning is generally better than
dusk since it helps prevent the growth of fungus. Early watering, and late
watering, also reduce water loss to evaporation. Watering early in the day is
also the best defence against slugs and other garden pests. Try not to water
when it’s windy – wind can blow sprinklers off target and speed
evaporation.

22. Add organic matter and use
efficient watering systems for shrubs, flower beds and lawns
Adding organic material to your soil will help increase its
absorption and water retention. Areas which are already planted can be ‘top
dressed’ with compost or organic matter.
You can greatly reduce the amount of
water used for shrubs, beds and lawns by:
– the strategic placement of
soaker hoses

installing a
rain
barrel water catchment system

– installing a simple
drip-irrigation system
Avoid
over-watering plants and shrubs, as this can actually diminish plant health and
cause yellowing of the leaves.
When hand watering, use a
variable
spray nozzle
for targeted
watering.

23. Don’t run the hose while washing
your car
Clean the car using a pail of soapy
water. Use the hose only for rinsing – this simple practice can save as much as
150 gallons when washing a car. Use a spray nozzle when rinsing for more
efficient use of water. Better yet, use a
waterless car washing
system
; there are several brands, such as EcoTouch, which are now on
the market.

24. Use a broom, not a hose, to
clean driveways and sidewalks

25. Check for leaks in pipes, hoses,
faucets and couplings
Leaks outside the house may not seem as bad
since they’re not as visible. But they can be just as wasteful as leaks indoors.
Check frequently to keep them drip-free. Use hose washers at spigots and hose
connections to eliminate leaks.

Water conservation comes naturally when
everyone in the family is aware of its importance, and parents take the time to
teach children some of the simple water-saving methods around the home which can
make a big difference.

Water
Conservation Summary

In 1990, 30 states in the US
reported ‘water-stress’ conditions. In 2000, the number of states reporting
water-stress rose to 40. In 2009, the number rose to 45. There is a worsening
trend in water supply nationwide. Taking measures at home to conserve water not
only saves you money, it also is of benefit to the greater
community.

Saving water at home does not require any significant cost
outlay. Although there are water-saving appliances and water conservation
systems such as rain barrels, drip irrigation and on-demand water heaters which
are more expensive, the bulk of water saving methods can be achieved at little
cost. For example, 75% of water used indoors is in the bathroom, and 25% of this
is for the toilet. The average toilet uses 4 gallons per flush (gpf). You can
invest in a ULF (ultra-low flush) toilet which will use only 2 gpf. But you can
also install a simple tank bank, costing about $2, which will save .8 gpf. This
saves 40% of what you would save with the ULF toilet. Using simple methods like
tank banks, low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators you can retrofit your home
for under$50.

By using water-saving features you can reduce your in-home
water use by 35%. This means the average household, which uses 130,000 gallons
per year, coulod save 44,00 gallons of water per year. On a daily basis, the
average household, using 350 gallons per day, could save 125 gallons of water
per day. The average individual, currently using 70 gallons per day, could save
25 gallons of water per day.

When buying
low-flow aerators, be sure to read the label for the actual ‘gpm’ (gallons per
minute) rating. Often, the big box retailers promote “low-flow” which are rated
at 2.5 gpm, which is at the top of the low-flow spectrum. This may be needed for
the kitchen sink, but we find that a 1.5 gpm aerator works fine for the bathroom
sink and most water outlets, delivering the same spray force in a comfortable,
soft stream. Eartheasy’s
online store carries a
full range of low-flow aerators and showerheads.

Finally, it should be
noted that installing low-flow aerators, showerheads, tank banks and other
water-saving devices usually is a very simple operation which can be done by the
homeowner and does not even require the use of tools. Water conservation at home
is one of the easiest measures to put in place, and saving water should become
part of everday family practice.

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Summer Check List

SUMMER: Here is a basic Check List to help get started to make it the best Summer Yet!

About the House:

  • Think ahead to fall. Schedule furnace maintenance now and beat the October rush. You’ll be snug and warm that first cold night.
  • Pestpatrol: inspect yard and garden for carpenter ants or termites. Call an exterminator if you see signs of infestation. Beware of fire ants in the South! If you see telltale mounds, treat with grits or borax. Keep borax away from children.
  • Keep tabs on decks, siding and trim. Will you need to perform touch-up work before winter? Order paint and be ready for the first cooler days of early autumn.
  • Control garbage can odor with a can clean-out. Rinse garbage cans with a hose, dump the water, then spray with disinfectant. Let the cans sit for 10 minutes, then rinse again. Turn upside down to dry.
  • Inspect gutters, and clean out any leafy debris. Summer thunderstorms won’t faze you if your gutters are in good working order.
  • Make a safety inspection of children’s outdoor play equipment. Tighten loose bolts and cover with plastic protectors.
  • Late summer is a slow time for home maintenance and cleaning companies. Look for summer discounts from carpet cleaners, gutter installers, and window washing firms, and get the jump on fall cleaning!
  • Prepare the medicine chest and first aid kit for summer’s little medical emergencies. In the bathroom, dispose of outdated medication as recommended by local health authorities. Be sure the first aid kit has ample adhesive bandages for scrapes, calamine lotion for insect bites, and hot/cold packs for strains or sprains. Print a first-aid kit checklist for your Household Notebook.
  • Make an emergency list for baby-sitters and school kids on vacation. Print an emergency numbers page to post by each household telephone. Include phone numbers for the fire department, police, poison control, and ambulance. Don’t forget numbers for parents at work, a family contact, and nearby neighbors. Be sure to write the home address on the list; it will aid rescuers if help is needed.
  • Print vacation packing lists for family travel. Include one list for each family member. Between vacation trips, store the lists inside the luggage or add them to your Household Notebook.
  • Tackle patio and sliding door tracks. Summer is open-door season, so be sure your doors open smoothly. Grab a bottle of all-purpose (degreasing) cleaner, a screwdriver and lots of rags. Spray the tracks generously and let sit for a few minutes to soften. Wrap the screwdriver with a rag, and make several careful passes along the track to get out the gunk.
  • Check washing machine hoses. Replace them if you find cracks or bulges–or if they’re over two years old.
  • Hold a garage sale. Declutter house and garage to turn cash to trash.

The Inside Story:

  • Late summer is a slow time for home maintenance and cleaning companies. Look for summer discounts from carpet cleaners, gutter installers, and window washing firms, and get the jump on fall cleaning!
  • Prepare the medicine chest and first aid kit for summer’s little medical emergencies. In the bathroom, dispose of outdated medication as recommended by local health authorities. Be sure the first aid kit has ample adhesive bandages for scrapes, calamine lotion for insect bites, and hot/cold packs for strains or sprains. Print a first-aid kit checklist for your Household Notebook.
  • Make an emergency list for baby-sitters and school kids on vacation. Print an emergency numbers page to post by each household telephone. Include phone numbers for the fire department, police, poison control, and ambulance. Don’t forget numbers for parents at work, a family contact, and nearby neighbors. Be sure to write the home address on the list; it will aid rescuers if help is needed.
  • Print vacation packing lists for family travel. Include one list for each family member. Between vacation trips, store the lists inside the luggage or add them to your Household Notebook.
  • Tackle patio and sliding door tracks. Summer is open-door season, so be sure your doors open smoothly. Grab a bottle of all-purpose (degreasing) cleaner, a screwdriver and lots of rags. Spray the tracks generously and let sit for a few minutes to soften. Wrap the screwdriver with a rag, and make several careful passes along the track to get out the gunk.
  • Check washing machine hoses. Replace them if you find cracks or bulges–or if they’re over two years old.
  • Hold a garage sale. Declutter house and garage to turn cash to trash!

More Summer Creative Cleaning coming soon!

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Summer Cleaning Chore Check list

Summer Cleaning Chore Checklist

By Cynthia Ewer
  

Summer is just around the corner and its going to be hot and sweaty. Vacations beckon. The garden takes on a life of its own.

Busy families don’t have much time for home chores these months. School’s out, travel’s in and it’s easy to let life slide on the home front.

Still, summer will run more smoothly if you keep tabs on these important areas in the Summer Cleaning Chore Checklist.  The checklist list tackles hot-weather issues, summer health and safety:

About the House:

  • Think ahead to fall. Schedule furnace maintenance now and beat the October rush. You’ll be snug and warm that first cold night.
  • Pestpatrol: inspect yard and garden for carpenter ants or termites. Call an exterminator if you see signs of infestation. Beware of fire ants in the South! If you see telltale mounds, treat with grits or borax. Keep borax away from children.
  • Keep tabs on decks, siding and trim. Will you need to perform touch-up work before winter? Order paint and be ready for the first cooler days of early autumn.
  • Control garbage can odor with a can clean-out. Rinse garbage cans with a hose, dump the water, then spray with disinfectant. Let the cans sit for 10 minutes, then rinse again. Turn upside down to dry.
  • Inspect gutters, and clean out any leafy debris. Summer thunderstorms won’t faze you if your gutters are in good working order.
  • Make a safety inspection of children’s outdoor play equipment. Tighten loose bolts and cover with plastic protectors.
  • Late summer is a slow time for home maintenance and cleaning companies. Look for summer discounts from carpet cleaners, gutter installers, and window washing firms, and get the jump on fall cleaning!
  • Prepare the medicine chest and first aid kit for summer’s little medical emergencies. In the bathroom, dispose of outdated medication as recommended by local health authorities. Be sure the first aid kit has ample adhesive bandages for scrapes, calamine lotion for insect bites, and hot/cold packs for strains or sprains. Print a first-aid kit checklist for your Household Notebook.
  • Make an emergency list for baby-sitters and school kids on vacation. Print an emergency numbers page to post by each household telephone. Include phone numbers for the fire department, police, poison control, and ambulance. Don’t forget numbers for parents at work, a family contact, and nearby neighbors. Be sure to write the home address on the list; it will aid rescuers if help is needed.
  • Print vacation packing lists for family travel. Include one list for each family member. Between vacation trips, store the lists inside the luggage or add them to your Household Notebook.
  • Tackle patio and sliding door tracks. Summer is open-door season, so be sure your doors open smoothly. Grab a bottle of all-purpose (degreasing) cleaner, a screwdriver and lots of rags. Spray the tracks generously and let sit for a few minutes to soften. Wrap the screwdriver with a rag, and make several careful passes along the track to get out the gunk.
  • Check washing machine hoses. Replace them if you find cracks or bulges–or if they’re over two years old.
  • Hold a garage sale. Declutter house and garage to turn cash to trash!

The Inside Story:

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Summer-Energy Savers For Your Home

Energy Savers In the Home:

Electricity can be expensive~

  • One way we can cut down and save is to do laundry in one day.  I know that sometimes is impossible but, it takes less energy from the washer and dryer and so less electricity expenses.  Let me explain:  When you wash/dry on several days…the washer and dryer have to re-start each day, each cycle. This causes more electricity to be used and causes your bill to increase. If you wash/dry on one day…the washer and dryer have already been started/heated, so it takes less time to produce energy. Therefore, less electricity and less on your bill. I have found that once a week washing and drying saves my household of 4 about $250.00 a year!  May not be a lot to some but every dollar counts in our family. Also, the laundry is complete and then we have more time for fun!
  • Hire a professional to seal and insulate leaky ducts, seal windows and doors. This will also help your home use less energy and less electricity.
  • Leave everything you can unplugged. The toaster, microwave, chargers, blow dryers, lights etc…every bit counts and reduces the chance of a fire.

Home:

  • Check to make sure your attic and attached garage is insulted properly. Check the R-value – the higher the R-value the greater the insulation.  Protects you from he extreme heat or extreme cold, therefore, helping your electricity
  • Check your AC unit to maker sure that you unit is not working over time. Usually if you keep it around 73-74, your unit will not have to work so hard. When you are gone for most of the day or if you are on vacation you can set the temperature about 76.
  • Replace air filters and clean vents often. Install ceiling fans. This will help better air circulations that will promote cooling in the Summer and heating efficiency in the winter.
  • Install blinds, drapes, curtains for protection from the sun and heat or extreme weather.
  • Apply a reflective coating to your roof. This will help absorb the suns energy.

Yard:

  • Plant a tree. Prune the trees, shrubs that you have.
  • Remove debris like grass and leaves that block airflow to your ac unit and gutters.

Landscaping is a natural way to shade your home, and add value to your property!

Finances:

  • Credit Cards. Call your credit card companies and see if they can give you a lower interest rate.  Or consolidate your bills and make one payment. Interest alone can drain your energy and your pocket book.
  • Bills. Ask your utility company about budget planning. This will help protect you from sudden or unexpected price increases.
  • Fixed Income. You can also contact your state local government; they may have energy assistance to help pay your utilities.

 These are just a few ideas to get you started to help have less stress on your Summer Energy!

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